How to avoid mosquitos when you're outside. Click on the titles below.

Use skin insect repellent

This is still one of the most effective solutions. Apply before leaving your hotel or apartment, especially during the later parts of the day or sunrise. Depending on the effectiveness of the lotion or spray, apply frequently to avoid bites, but always following the product label instructions carefully. 

Mosquitos can penetrate clothing

Cotton and linen typically won’t protect you against bug bites. But many synthetic fibers, particularly high-tech athletic apparel, tend to be woven tightly enough to keep mosquitos out.

If you don’t want to look like Usain Bolt 24/7, you can always choose to protect your clothes with Wild at Ease®, mosquito repellent for clothes and home textiles. You can apply it in all kinds of textiles! Get our repellent here.

Choose a breezy spot

Almost any breeze, above 1MPH, will make it very difficult for mosquitos to fly.

When your heart rate is elevated, your body produces more CO2 and that makes you irresistible to mosquitos

Carbon Dioxide (CO2) is the primary thing mosquitoes search for to identify food sources and anything that cranks up your metabolic rate will increase your CO2 production.
For example, exercise, drinking alcohol or eating spicy foods. Being overweight or pregnant can also up your CO2 output.

Avoid getting too hot

This advice is especially important if you’re in a hot, humid climate. Mosquitoes are thought to be attracted to warm bodies, so staying cool is one way to avoid unwanted bites.
Dark-colored fabrics absorb more heat from the sun than light-colored alternatives, so avoid them.
Also, avoid excessive exercise when possible. Not only will exercise cause you to radiate heat, it will also cause you to breathe heavily. Carbon Dioxide can be smelled by mosquitos even at relatively long distances.

Wear appropriate clothing

Mosquitoes use their vision to search for food sources during the daylight hours. And since they fly very close to the ground, they tend to find targets by looking for things that contrast with the horizon. Dark colors stand out, but light colors are less attractive to them.
Loose, long-sleeved, neutral and pastel colored clothing is advised to help prevent mosquito bites.

Avoid peak mosquito hours

Wind typically dissipates as the sun rises and sets and the lack of wind at those times also brings mosquitoes out to feed. If you can, schedule your outdoor outings at other times of the day.

Don't spray skin repellent like it's perfume

Squirt a little onto your hands and rub it, especially onto your ankles, elbows, wrists, forehead and all the other places where your skin is thin because that’s where mosquitoes love to feed. 

Wristbands or other wearable DEET items don't work

DEET works by blocking mosquito’s CO2 receptors. That happens when a mosquito lands on your skin and comes into contact with the DEET. They’ll still land on you if you apply it, but they won’t bite.
Because DEET isn’t a scent-based repellent, any form of it that isn’t spread on your skin won’t work. So, skip the wristbands, ankles and other bogus DEET wearables.

How to avoid mosquitos when you're outside. Click on the titles below.

Use skin insect repellent

This is still one of the most effective solutions. Apply before leaving your hotel or apartment, especially during the later parts of the day or sunrise. Depending on the effectiveness of the lotion or spray, apply frequently to avoid bites, but always following the product label instructions carefully. 

Mosquitos can penetrate clothing

Cotton and linen typically won’t protect you against bug bites. But many synthetic fibers, particularly high-tech athletic apparel, tend to be woven tightly enough to keep mosquitos out.

If you don’t want to look like Usain Bolt 24/7, you can always choose to protect your clothes with Wild at Ease®, mosquito repellent for clothes and home textiles. You can apply it in all kinds of textiles! Get our repellent here.

Choose a breezy spot

Almost any breeze, above 1MPH, will make it very difficult for mosquitos to fly.

When your heart rate is elevated, your body produces more CO2 and that makes you irresistible to mosquitos

Carbon Dioxide (CO2) is the primary thing mosquitoes search for to identify food sources and anything that cranks up your metabolic rate will increase your CO2 production.
For example, exercise, drinking alcohol or eating spicy foods. Being overweight or pregnant can also up your CO2 output.

Avoid getting too hot

This advice is especially important if you’re in a hot, humid climate. Mosquitoes are thought to be attracted to warm bodies, so staying cool is one way to avoid unwanted bites.
Dark-colored fabrics absorb more heat from the sun than light-colored alternatives, so avoid them.
Also, avoid excessive exercise when possible. Not only will exercise cause you to radiate heat, it will also cause you to breathe heavily. Carbon Dioxide can be smelled by mosquitos even at relatively long distances.

Wear appropriate clothing

Mosquitoes use their vision to search for food sources during the daylight hours. And since they fly very close to the ground, they tend to find targets by looking for things that contrast with the horizon. Dark colors stand out, but light colors are less attractive to them.
Loose, long-sleeved, neutral and pastel colored clothing is advised to help prevent mosquito bites.

Avoid peak mosquito hours

Wind typically dissipates as the sun rises and sets and the lack of wind at those times also brings mosquitoes out to feed. If you can, schedule your outdoor outings at other times of the day.

Don't spray skin repellent like it's perfume

Squirt a little onto your hands and rub it, especially onto your ankles, elbows, wrists, forehead and all the other places where your skin is thin because that’s where mosquitoes love to feed. 

Wristbands or other wearable DEET items don't work

DEET works by blocking mosquito’s CO2 receptors. That happens when a mosquito lands on your skin and comes into contact with the DEET. They’ll still land on you if you apply it, but they won’t bite.
Because DEET isn’t a scent-based repellent, any form of it that isn’t spread on your skin won’t work. So, skip the wristbands, ankles and other bogus DEET wearables.